Calendar of Events

Sep 08, 2014 to Sep 10, 2014 | Chicago, IL
Sep 29, 2014 to Oct 03, 2014 | Michigan State University, Lansing MI
Oct 01, 2014 to Oct 03, 2014 | Washington, DC

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Public Utilities Reports

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Two Penn. Utilities Offer Restructuring Proposal

Lori A. Burkhart

In the second phase of the Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission's (PUC's) investigation into electric industry restructuring, Metropolitan Edison (ME) and Pennsylvania Electric (PE) have proposed a regional wholesale electricity market based on the Pennsylvania-New Jersey-Maryland power pool. All electric generators would sell into the market, which would function as a spot market, while accommodating bilateral contracts.

The pool would coordinate all power sales and purchases to assure the reliability and integrity of the regional electric grid.

Frontlines

Bruce W. Radford

On Saturday, November 11, WPL Holdings, Inc. announced its three-way merger with IES Industries Inc. and Interstate Power Co. to form Interstate Energy. The very next day, in a full-page ad that ran in Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel, Madison Gas & Electric Co. launched its counteroffensive, featuring Boris the Pig.

"Hi (em I'm Big Boris," the ad begins. (The face of a handsome pig with a large snout stares back at the reader.) "My friends and I crave Radical Electric Deregulation.

Hurdling Ever Higher: A New Obstacle Course for Mergers at the FERC?

John F. Mandt and Karl R. Moor

For the partners in a utility merger, the celebration must wait. After opening the most delicate of dialogues, and then negotiating the price and closing the deal, the merger partners must yet gain the approval of regulators. The application may lie sealed in its FedEx pouch, safely on its way to Washington.

Frontlines

Bruce W. Radford

John Anderson is jumping out of his shoes. And his socks, too. His group, the Electricity Consumers Resource Council (ELCON, where Anderson serves as executive director) may at last get its way.During a few weeks in October, a good half-dozen energy industry players (em including utilities and regulators (em came out in favor of customer choice for electric and gas service.

Electric Restructing and the California "MOU"Alex Henney

Alex Henney

The California Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) is an agreement between Southern California Edison Co. (SCE), the California Manufacturers' Association, the California Large Energy Consumers' Association, and the Independent Energy Producers. It tackles three major issues:s recovery of stranded assets

s market power

s market structure.

If the MOU is eventually endorsed, it might be a landmark in electric restructuring \(em and not only in California.

Collision or Coexistence: The FERC, the CPUC, and Electric Restructuring

Sheila S. Hollis and Stephen L. Teichler

Will the Crown accept the olive branch offered by its colony, or will conflict ensue? That was the question posed on July 13 by Thomas Page, CEO of San Diego Gas and Electric Co., at the "Western States Workshop on California Restructuring," the first industrywide meeting to discuss the policy proposals issued six weeks before by the California Public Utilities Commission (CPUC).The Crown sent its emissaries.

Frontlines

Bruce W. Radford

For a good half a century, electric regulation has meant law, accounting, and economics. But no more. Now it's all about computers, telecommunications, and file-transfer protocols. Forget about CWIP, AFUDC, double leverage, and interest synchronization. They are all irrelevant.

Paper Electrons and Power Pools: Complementary Markets for a Deregulated Environment

Stephen Baum and John Treat

The winds of competition are blowing. Some find them chilling; others find them exhilarating. Deregulation calls on competitive markets to stand in for regulatory decisions, giving more choice to customers, reducing costs dramatically, and requiring new capabilities.

Competition is already transforming major portions of the electric industry.

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