Calendar of Events

Sep 08, 2014 to Sep 10, 2014 | Chicago, IL
Sep 29, 2014 to Oct 03, 2014 | Michigan State University, Lansing MI
Oct 01, 2014 to Oct 03, 2014 | Washington, DC

Keywords

Public Utilities Reports

PUR Guide 2012 Fully Updated Version

Available NOW!
PUR Guide

This comprehensive self-study certification course is designed to teach the novice or pro everything they need to understand and succeed in every phase of the public utilities business.

Order Now

RTO

Where Is Super-FERC?

Sweeping revisions to Order 888 are needed before true wholesale competition can take place.

Richard Stavros, Executive Editor

There’s been a lot of talk in the industry about new super powers for market enforcement, conferred by Congress on FERC in last year’s energy legislation. But this hasn’t been the case entirely. Many believe that FERC still labors at a disadvantage.

The Too-Perfect Hedge

Congress gives FERC an impossible task: Craft long-term transmission rights to save native load from paying grid congestion costs.

Bruce W. Radford

If “perfect” be the enemy of the “good,” then look no further for proof than in Federal Power Act section 217(b)(4), enacted by Congress in EPACT 2005.

Barriers to Transmission Superhighways

History teaches us that the most successful American businesses emerge from the crucible of competition.

Ed Krapels

Important challenges still confront the development of a coherent strategy to create an efficient modern transmission system. Assuming FERC and Congress are earnest about creating a 21st century grid, new ideas, projects, and technologies need to emerge.

East Vs. West: Growing the Grid

The models and motives behind tomorrow’s transmission expansion.

Bruce W. Radford

Major transmission projects based on two distinct models are showing signs of life. What can these projects teach us about future transmission investment?

A Candy-Coated Grid

Incentives for transmission investment could boost postage-stamp pricing over license-plate rates.

Bruce W. Radford

FERC proposed a new set of regulations, under the new section 219 of the Federal Power Act, explaining in broad outline how it might approve generous financial incentives for new investments in transmission—incentives once dubbed as “candy.” As of mid-January, the new NOPR had spawned more industry comment than just about any other FERC proposal in recent memory.

Market Resurgence

Banks are reshaping the energy-trading landscape. When the dust settles, utility companies will face different strategic horizons.

By Michael T. Burr

Utility executives face volatile energy markets, skyrocketing fuel prices, and changing federal energy policies. How are utilities benefiting from the turnaround in energy trading?

Long-Term Transmission Rights: A High-Stakes Debate

The absence of long-term transmission rights could exclude potential competition—and cause higher electricity costs.

Laurence D. Kirsch

Power-industry restructuring redistributed financial uncertainties that discourage generation investment and ultimately raise the price of electricity to consumers.

Winning the Merger Game

A new wave of consolidation is coming. To succeed, a company must understand where its strengths are.

Peter Lorenz, Matt Pond, and Thomas Seitz

Companies that relied heavily on mergers and acquisitions generated more than half of the value in the power industry during the past 10 years. Furthermore, more than half that value was generated by a handful of companies. How did they do it?

After EPACT: A Mad, Mad Scramble for Talent

The Energy Policy Act of 2005 makes human resource challenges even more significant.

Michael B. Brown

Hidden in the 1,700-plus pages of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 is a set of regulatory requirements that will redefine the technology, leadership, training, culture, compensation, job design, and organizational models currently employed in the industry.

The Merger Paradox

More consolidation could trim costs, but some CEOs fear a backlash from regulators.

Richard Stavros, Executive Editor

With the possible exception of keeping the lights on, the merger game dwarfs just about every other question facing today’s electric utilities. The last big wave of consolidation hit in the late 1990s. Now the forecast calls for a repeat performance, but don’t bet the farm. There’s a hitch, you see. It’s today’s high commodity costs.

Pages