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Public Utilities Reports

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Fortnightly Magazine - March 2005

Business & Money

Sticking to the Knitting:
Dean C. Maschoff, Thomas F. Read, and R. John Dingle

Business & Money

Sticking to the Knitting:

A review of three years of post-Enron stock performance by electric utilities.

Immediately following the Enron collapse, investors dumped the stock of any electric power company that appeared to be pursuing non-traditional growth strategies. Any company that emphasized unregulated businesses-investments in overseas assets, merchant power plant development, and energy marketing and trading-was suspect.

Technology Corridor

Mobile workers provide the next opportunity for utility productivity gains.
David Rouls

Technology Corridor

Mobile workers provide the next opportunity for utility productivity gains.

Field workers at many electric, gas, and water utilities have not realized the benefits of their company's substantial investments in office-based information technology (IT) systems for work and asset management, customer service and billing, geographic information systems, mobile technologies, or even e-mail.

Energy Risk & Market

SPECIAL SERIES Part 3
Tom Brady

SPECIAL SERIES Part 3

Energy Risk & Markets

Default Retail Supply:

New Jersey's recent basic generation service auction shows how ignoring the many sources of risk can be financially ruinous.

Bidding at last year's basic generation service (BGS) auction in New Jersey was generally found to be extremely aggressive as many merchant energy providers watched in amazement as the bid prices continued to fall during the course of the auction.

The Global LNG Gamble

The Geopolitical Risks of LNG
Michael T. Burr

The Geopolitical Risks of LNG

To many energy-industry analysts, 2005 is a make-or-break year for the U.S. gas market. If we don't have at least several liquefied natural gas (LNG) terminals in construction by the end of the year, the country arguably will face serious gas-supply shortages and price spikes beginning in about 2008.1

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