Calendar of Events

Apr 28, 2014 | New York, NY
May 05, 2014 to May 08, 2014 | Las Vegas, Nevada

Keywords

Public Utilities Reports

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EPA

EPA's Big Bet on Green Trading

Environmental Emissions: The cost to power markets of the Clean Air Interstate Rule depends on the ability to trade mercury.

Peter Rosenthal

The decision to limit mercury provides cover for utilities reluctant to spend on controlling NOx and SO2, while boosting other companies

Mercury: Much Ado About Nothing?

How the Clean Air Mercury Rule will affect coal prices.

Hans Daniels

The Clean Air Mercury Rule impacts new and existing coal-fired electric generating plants through a market-based cap-and-trade program similar to the EPA’s highly successful Acid Rain Program. The first phase of the program in 2010 reduces mercury emissions to 38 tons. The second phase goes into action in 2018 with a final mercury emissions cap of 15 tons. The key question is: what extent will the new rule reduce coal’s dominance in the electric generation market?

People

Exelon appointed Tom Ridge and Dr. William C. Richardson to its board of directors. NiSource Inc. has restructured its leadership team. Hydro-Québec appointed André Caillé chairman of its board of directors and Thierry Vandal as president and CEO of the company. Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission (PUC) Chairman Wendell F. Holland recently was named president of the Mid-Atlantic Conference of Regulatory Utilities Commissioners. And others...

The EPA Speaks Out: The Clean Air Interstate Rule Explained

The Environmental Protection Agency reviews how the multi-pollutant control concept is to work.

Misha Adamantiades, Linda Chappell, and Sam Napolitano

Currently, 132 areas do not meet the new National Ambient Air Quality Standards for fine particles or ozone, affecting some 160 million people, or 57 percent of the U.S. population. What efforts are under way by the EPA to bring these areas into compliance?

Guns, Butter, or Green?

Utilities will face stark tradeoffs in meeting the next round of emissions controls.

Richard Stavros

Some utility execs gasp at the shear breadth of environmental proposals being bandied about during the past few weeks. Even the environmentalists are calling "historical" the extent to which different kinds of emissions will be regulated.

A Changing U.S. Climate

GREENHOUSE-GAS EMISSIONS
Sanne B. Jacobsen, Neil J. Numark And Paloma Sarria

GREENHOUSE-GAS EMISSIONS

The states are getting into the act on greenhouse emissions, and the power industry is getting more proactive. What policy measures are appropriate?

A growing number of U.S. utility companies have come out in favor of federal mandatory limits on emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2) from their facilities.

Coal Gasification Gets Real

The technology works, but public policy will dictate its future.
Michael T. Burr

The technology works, but public policy will dictate its future.

A distant train whistle breaks the silence of a mid-winter evening on Minnesota's Iron Range. The melancholy sound echoes across the expanse of a frozen lake that now fills a long-disused LTV Steel pit near the town of Hoyt Lakes.

Power Measurements

A new way to measure what matters most: how close a unit comes to meeting its total potential profit.
Tom Ottem and Michael McNair

Power Measurement

A new way to measure what matters most: how close a unit comes to meeting its total potential profit.

Approximately 65 percent of capacity additions in the last few years have been gas-fired, combined-cycle units. Recent market conditions have been hard on these new resources, which have suffered from significantly low capacity factors. But such units are popular because of their flexibility.

Solving The Crisis In Unscheduled Power

While NAESB and NERC struggle over the issue, North America steadily drifts toward unreliability.
Robert Blohm

While NAESB and NERC struggle over the issue, North America steadily drifts toward unreliability.

Time is running out. It's been more than two years since the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) Joint Inadvertent Interchange Taskforce (JIITF), on which I served, issued its white paper[1] proposing how to price the unscheduled power (inadvertent interchange)1 flowing between NERC-certified balancing authorities (BAs).

Global Warming: The Gathering Storm

Russia resurrects the Kyoto Protocol and the prospect of either mandatory CO2 emissions cuts for U.S. utilities, or the start of a global trade war.
Peter J. Fontaine, Esquire

Russia resurrects the Kyoto Protocol and the prospect of either mandatory CO2 emissions cuts for U.S. utilities, or the start of a global trade war.

In June 2001, the Bush administration withdrew an earlier campaign pledge to support the Kyoto Protocol, claiming that the treaty was fatally flawed in not requiring China and India to reduce carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions and that the science underpinning the treaty was not yet definitive enough to justify the costs of compliance.1

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