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Smart Grid in America and Europe (Part I)

Similar desires, different approaches.

Fortnightly Magazine - January 2011

[hereinafter U.S. Grid 2030 ]; U.S. Dep’t of Energy, “Executive Summary,” in U.S. Smart Grid Report iv–v (2009).

 3. U.S. Grid 2030 , supra note 23, at 17.

 4. European Comm’n, European SmartGrids Technology Platform: Vision and Strategy for Europe’s Electricity Networks of the Future 4–5, 12, 24 (2006) [hereinafter E.U. SmartGrids Vision & Strategy ] (stating that European grid will need upgrades valued at 500 billion; therefore, the money should be invested in future technology instead of “like-for-like replacement”); U.S. Grid 2030 , supra note 23, at 4–9.

 5. Clark W. Gellings, “The Smart Grid: Enabling Energy Efficiency and Demand Response” (2009); U.S. Grid 2030 , supra note 23, at 17.

 6. E.U. SmartGrids Vision & Strategy , supra note 45, at 15–18, 27–18; U.S. Grid 2030 , supra note 23, at 17.

 7. U.S. Grid 2030 , supra note 23, at 17.

 8. E.U. SmartGrids Vision & Strategy , supra note 45, at 4. The tasks are:
Better facilitate the connection and operation of generators of all sizes and technologies; allow consumers to play a part in optimizing the operation of the system; provide consumers with greater information and options for choice of supply; significantly reduce the environmental impact of the whole electricity supply system; deliver enhanced levels of reliability and security of supply.
E.U.
SmartGrids SDD, supra note 12, at 4, 6–7. One recurring goal is to foster market integration towards a pan-European integrated market. Id. at 8.

 9. U.S. Dep’t of Energy, U.S. Smart Grid Report 10 (2009), (“To convey the present situation of smart-grid deployment, the report uses a set of six characteristics derived from the seven characteristics of the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Modern Grid Strategy project and documented in ‘Characteristics of the Modern Grid’ (NETL 2008).”). It enables informed participation by customers, accommodates all generation and storage options, enables new products, services, and markets, provides power quality for a range of needs, optimizes asset utilization and operating efficiently, and operates resiliently to disturbances, attacks, and natural disasters. Id.

10. E.U. SmartGrids Vision & Strategy , supra note 45, at 4–5.

11. U.S. Grid 2030 , supra note 23, at 17, 21.

12. E.U. SmartGrids Vision & Strategy , supra note 45, at 4, 20–21; U.S. Grid 2030 , supra note 23, at 20–21

13. E.U. SmartGrids Vision & Strategy , supra note 45, at 4, 21, 24–25; U.S. Grid 2030 , supra note 23, at 21.

14. E.U. SmartGrids Vision & Strategy , supra note 45, at 20, 24. Broadband communications and automation will create a “smart grid,” along with superconducting cables and will “enable[ ] real time market transactions and seamless interfaces among people, buildings, industrial plants, generation facilities, and the electric network.” U.S. Grid 2030 , supra note 23, at 17.

15. E.U. SmartGrids SDD , supra note 12, at 14; E.U. SmartGrids Vision & Strategy , supra note 45, at 4–5; U.S. Smart Grid Report , supra note 910, at 26; U.S. Grid 2030 , supra note 23, at 20.

16. Communication from the Commission to the European Parliament, the Council,