Energy People: Barry Worthington

Deck: 

We talked with Barry Worthington, Executive Director of the United States Energy Association (USEA)

We talked with Barry Worthington, Executive Director of the United States Energy Association (USEA)

Fortnightly Magazine - February 2017
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Barry Worthington is the Executive Director of the United States Energy Association (USEA), the U.S Member Committee of the World Energy Council. USEA has one hundred fifty members across the U.S. energy sector, from the largest Fortune 500 companies to small energy consulting firms. Mr. Worthington represents the broad interests of the U.S. energy industry and meets with domestic and international energy leaders to advance information and unearth partnerships to develop energy infrastructure projects across the world.

USEA's team of international energy specialists works with the U.S. federal government, energy companies and energy ministers to build out energy infrastructure in developing countries. Mr. Worthington and his team have developed thousands of energy projects globally, from geothermal drilling operations in sub-Saharan Africa to smart grid electricity projects in central Europe.

PUF's Steve Mitnick: You are one of the faces of the U.S. energy industry internationally. I'm sure there's been a lot of talk about political changes in the U.S. with the election and the new administration, including its impact on energy. Do you have any thoughts about what you've been hearing and the questions people have been asking?

Barry Worthington: The USEA is the U.S. member of the World Energy Council. We were created in 1923 to serve in that role. We have counterparts in about ninety-five countries.

People in other countries are always fascinated by U.S. elections. This time, because so many of the pollsters had discounted Donald Trump, many people outside the U.S. were more surprised than people here, that he was successful.

They get snippets of U.S. news from the major international news media. Of course, everyone gets CNN around the world now, but they don't all get the other channels. So people were getting a little bit of a different perspective in other countries than we were here in the U.S.

During the campaign, if you looked at my hometown in north central Pennsylvania, you did see a lot of Trump signs; you didn't see Hillary signs. 

Many people were pleasantly surprised by the election's outcome. They clearly seek someone who's going to set a different political tone than what we've been used to for the past several decades.

The President said all kinds of good things, positive things about energy, during the campaign. He clearly is a supporter of fossil fuel: coal, oil, and natural gas. That is of great interest to many people.

But I think at the end of the day we're going to see that the new president is an "all of the above" energy guy. I don't recall him being negative toward renewables during the campaign. I think we're going to see an "all of the above" type of administration.

PUF's Steve Mitnick: You've had contact with some of the key people that might be in the administration, like the USEA Man of the Year, Rex Tillerson. You know several more of these key people. Could you talk about what they're thinking, as far as

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