Podcasts

Leadership Lyceum

Leadership Lyceum: A CEO’s Virtual Mentor

This podcast series focuses on corporate and industry strategy and trends from the direct vantage point of key industry leaders. Subscribe to the podcast at Apple iTunes. Interviews with Tom Fanning and Bob Flexon are available, as well as one with Joe Rigby, Bob Skaggs and Les Silverman.

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Calendar of Events

Apr 09, 2017 to Apr 12, 2017
| Phoenix, AZ
May 02, 2017 to May 05, 2017
| Orlando, FL
May 21, 2017 to May 23, 2017
| Orlando, FL

Keywords

Public Utilities Reports

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Renewables

Renewable Portfolio Standards: Changing the Industry

Updates and Forecast for 2017

Brian Nese and Allison Post Harris

Since 1983, renewable portfolio standards have been enacted in 29 states, with 8 others setting different benchmarks. In addition to increasing renewable energy generation in states that have adopted these standards, the standards have driven renewable energy development in states without them.

Energy Future in Ohio Corn Fields

Village of Minster, Ohio

K Kaufmann

The real significance and impact of the Minster project lies in the story behind it. It’s the town’s remarkable ability to complete a privately financed solar-plus-storage installation. The leaders have flown under the radar in a state known as one of the least friendly to renewable energy in the nation.

Tom Fanning: Leadership Lyceum Podcast Summary

Conversation with a Prime Mover: Tom Fanning, Chairman and CEO of Southern Company

Tom Fanning, with Tom Linquist

A summary of Tom Linquist's conversation with Tom Fanning, Southern Company CEO, on strategy and investment. Full podcast available.

Community Solar: States Are Testing Designs While Driving Forward

Minnesota, Oregon, New York case studies

Andrew Moratzka and Sara Bergan

Minnesota, Oregon and New York are certainly not alone in testing shared solar models. But the developments in each state in spring 2016 should shed light on the ability to deliver on the promise of community solar.

Response to Brown Re: Net Metering

A response to the letter to the editor by Ashley Brown in our February 2016 issue.

Charles Cicchetti

Is rooftop solar more like an independent power producer, subject to societal regulation and policy, such as wholesale-level regulation or retail-level resource planning? Or is the electricity that is produced a private consumer good, immune from regulation, policy, and planning?

Musk and Me

I signed up for a free quote on line.

Steve Huntoon

With all the talk of the “existential threat” to traditional utilities from solar and other disruptive technologies (and the blowback against net metering in various states), I thought I’d check out SolarCity first hand.

New Regulatory Paradigm Needed Now

The time is now for establishing concrete rules, roles and responsibilities for utilities and other participants.

Paul A. DeCotis

Driven by policy directives over which utilities have little control, DERs will remain both a threat and opportunity until regulators agree on a new paradigm to support distributed energy resources.

A Rose By Any Other Name: Response to 'Solar Battle Lines'

Vitriol is to exploit the public’s inclination to favor solar to make utilities pay an exorbitant political price to have policy decided on the merits.

David Raskin

If a solar panel owner can sell at bundled retail rate, while generators are paid LMP, this is discriminatory pricing.

Getting Past Net Metering

A forward-looking solution to rate reform, for when solar costs hit bottom.

John Sterling

Why keep rate design shackled to the ways of the past, especially at the dawn of a solar revolution?

Solar Shines As Regulatory Battles Abound

A tough legal and financial terrain is confronting producers, utilities and regulators.

Ken Silverstein

State commissions are challenged to find the sweet spot whereby utilities can afford to maintain their systems and homeowners are motivated to go green.

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