Renewable Energy News

 
 
 

Duke completes solar project in North Carolina

Duke Energy Renewables completed construction of a 12.5-MW solar power project in Beaufort County, N.C. North Carolina Eastern Municipal Power Agency (NCEMPA) is purchasing the output under a 15-year agreement. Duke contracted with SunEnergy1, a solar design, engineering and construction company based in Mooresville, N.C., to build the 53,000-panel photovoltaic (PV) project. SunEnergy1 designed the solar array and will continue to handle operations, monitoring, and maintenance of the system. 

EDF begins operating Bobcat Bluff wind project

EDF Renewable Energy, formerly enXco, started operations at the 150-MW Bobcat Bluff wind project in Archer County, 20 miles south of Wichita Falls, Texas. The project, consisting of 100 GE 1.5-MW turbines, spans about 12,500 contiguous acres. EDF Renewable Services will operate and maintain the facility, while EDF Trading provides energy management services and acts as the qualified scheduling entity. EDF Renewable Energy acquired the project in March 2012 and began construction in April.

Ocotillo 265-MW wind project begins commercial operation

Pattern Energy’s Ocotillo wind project in Southern California began commercial operation, transmitting energy to the Sunrise Powerlink, a newly constructed 117-mile 500-kv transmission line connecting San Diego and the Imperial Valley. The 265-MW Ocotillo project in Imperial Valley has 94 turbines now operational. An additional 18 turbines are expected to be installed in the spring of 2013. San Diego Gas & Electric (SDG&E) will buy the output under a 20-year agreement.

GE to install WindControl software for First Wind projects

GE will install WindControl advanced software to help maximize energy output at two First Wind projects in Maine. The two wind farms are located in Rollins and Stetson. The Rollins site has 40 GE 1.5-77 turbines while Stetson contains 55 turbines. The WindControl software automatically controls the output of each wind turbine in the wind farm, versus an approach that depends on starting and stopping units to match changes in power demand.