Frontlines & Op-Ed

Innovate Thyself

PUF Transforms, Expands, Multiplies

PUF 2.0: a new digital magazine published on the 15th each month. Public Utilities Fortnightly is fortnightly again.

The Times, They are a-Changin'

A response to the May 2017 From the Editor by PUF Editor-in-Chief Steve Mitnick

A more active and informed citizenry, involved in plotting electricity's path forward, isn't a cold, hard truth. It's a good thing.

Industry Sage David Owens Retires

Honoring Him with Our First PUF’s Owen Young Award

Owens has been the industry’s debater-in-chief. This month, uncharacteristically, he’s decided to put down the mic for good.

Cold Hard Truths

Who shall lay out those constraints, clearly, credibly?

What are the coldest hardest truths that a much more involved public must grasp?

'Markets' Test

We Called Them 'Markets.' Now We're Testing Them.

We're enamored of free markets, particularly in the nineties. But power markets cannot come close to emulating authentic competition. Why? They cannot satisfy the basic conditions of competition taught in microeconomics 101.

Letter: Response to Cicchetti Re: Residential Demand Charges

A response to the article by Charles Cicchetti in our December 2016 issue

Charles Cicchetti's December 2016 article asserts TOU rates are a preferable alternative to demand charges for distributed energy resources (DER) customers. But TOU rates are not enough to maximize the benefits of DER.

Why Innovation?

Also, What, Who, Where, When?

Why is innovation all the rage? Yes, continual improvement always makes sense. But the dramatic changes being talked about, are they that urgent? Let's recognize how much customers vary in their electricity wants and needs, within service territories, between territories, and between states.

In Only the Second Period of Low Real Rates and Bills

How Should We Manage and Regulate Now?

Electric bills this March were just a tick off the pace of the all-time low. In this unique period, how should we regulate utilities? Should we correct course? Should we allow greater growth of non-fuel costs to – let’s say – buy some more reliability?

Hiding Electricity's Complexity

Should We Lift the Curtain?

Almost nobody realizes the most advanced technology helps us manage grids, operate plants, integrate renewables, route flows, limit peak demand, and restore service after storms. Should we lift the curtain covering the network’s complexity?