Podcasts

Leadership Lyceum

Leadership Lyceum: A CEO's Virtual Mentor

This podcast series focuses on corporate and industry strategy and trends from the direct vantage point of key industry leaders. Subscribe to the podcast at Apple iTunes. Several interviews are available here: See Podcasts

Calendar of Events

Apr 09, 2017 to Apr 12, 2017
| Phoenix, AZ
May 02, 2017 to May 05, 2017
| Orlando, FL
May 21, 2017 to May 23, 2017
| Orlando, FL

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Public Utilities Reports

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Natural gas

Action Needed Now To Prevent More Nuclear Plant Closures

Threat to nearly one-fifth of our nation’s ninety-nine reactors is real

Maria Korsnick

Individually, these closures are understandable financial decisions. But the cumulative impact endangers any chance of meeting U.S. climate change goals.

Public Weighs In on Market Conditions Threatening Nuclear Power Plants

Examining the problem for nuclear power shows value in informing the public.

Ann Stouffer Bisconti

What should be done to create market conditions to prevent the loss of the nation’s only zero-carbon large-scale baseload electricity source?

A Five-Point Plan For The Next Wave Of Electricity Restructuring

The monopoly utility model was once expansive and revolutionary. Now, it is contracting and preservationist.

Philip O’Connor, Wayne Olson, and Robert Bussa

A plan for restructuring: Delivery service pricing reform; devolution of generation and re-allocating risk; stranded cost recovery; distributed resources neutrality; optimization of service offerings.

How the Environmental Movement Changed its Mind on Nuclear Power

The anti-growth, anti-people extremists who started the anti-nuclear movement were wrong.

Michael Shellenberger

If nuclear were subsidized at the same levels as solar and wind, or allowed to contribute to state RPS, nuclear would continue to be highly economical.

The Gas-Power Vision: Five Obstacles

Regulatory and rate proceedings at FERC can be time consuming and expensive, but this hurdle can be overcome.

Ron Hrehor and Don Sytsma

For the natural gas infrastructure and the available pipeline system capacity to be utilized as a foundation for the reduction in power transmission congestion, there are certain issues that need to be addressed.

No, Edison Wouldn't Recognize Today's Electric Industry

A put down of the industry’s innovation can be put aside

Steve Mitnick

The last year of Edison’s life was vastly different from today. Residential electric consumption is about 140 times greater than 1930.

Nuclear Life Extension

Deciding whether to go forward with a second license renewal.

Lee Williams

A majority of nuclear power plant operators already have received operating license renewals – to operate their plants for 20 years beyond the 40 years outlined in their initial operating licenses. As utilities decide whether or not to invest in license renewal, they must consider three key questions.

Rhode Island: The Challenge of an Aging Infrastructure

2015 Regulators Forum

Paul J. Roberti, Rhode Island PUC

Clearly, one of the most significant issues we face today is aging infrastructure. It’s akin to a marathon – a race we absolutely have to finish. Since 1990 we’ve replaced more than 65,000 miles of cast iron and bare steel pipe, but we still have a long way to go.

Georgia: On Becoming a Social Media Junkie

2015 Regulators Forum

Tim Echols, Georgia PSC

Being in the “energy” business as a commissioner, staff, lobbyist or industry leader is hard enough without social media, right? When you add Twitter and Facebook to the mix, it is enough to drive one crazy. Who needs it? Well, we all do, really.

South Dakota: A Unique Fuel Mix

Chris Nelson, vice-chairman, South Dakota Pub. Utils. Comm’n

2015 Regulators Forum

Seventy-three percent of our generation is carbon-free, yet the EPA’s 111(d) rules require a 48 percent reduction in our CO2 emission rate. That steep reduction will be very difficult to achieve and will be costly for our electric customers. The commission’s chief concern is keeping a lid on consumer prices, especially given the pressure exerted by EPA.

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